Notes on ‘A Tally Of Types’

I didn’t get around to updating notes on the Monotype Recorder about Stanley Morison previously, but did come away from reading it with nothing but admiration for Morison, someone who had previously completely passed me by. But one thing that does need mentioning here before proceeding is that Morison is responsible for Gill Sans being created, as originally Eric Gill had only designed it as a display font for a shop. Morison was the person who convinced Gill to design a complete face, or so claims The Monotype Recorder.

Anyway, since reading the Monotype Recorder, I’ve been on the look out for more books about Morison, and was lucky enough to come across A Tally Of Types and Selected Correspondence, (the letters of Morison and American printer D.B Updike—more to follow on this another time). 

A Tally Of Types was originally published in a 450 copy private edition as a Christmas keepsake for friends of Cambridge University Press. Morison had used/convinced CUP to back him in his request to Monotype to recut many historical typefaces, the weight of such a substantial printer helping to convince Monotype of the viability of his plans.

Tally, as it became affectionately known, was republished in 1973 in the edition I discovered, extended by ‘several hands’.

"The Tally is an account, historical, critical and functional, of the types cut under Morison’s direction [at Monotype] during this [1920s–1930s] period." So says editor of the 1973 edition, Brooke Crutchley.

The several hands involved in updating the second edition include: Miss P.M. Handover, John Dreyfus, Harry Carter, Nicolas Barker, James Mosley, Mike Parker, Giovanni Mardersteig and Netty Hoeflake.

The monograms littered throughout the book go uncredited except for the title page engraving by Reynolds Stone, although I highly expect that the one on p97, (pictured here), is by Eric Gill.

One of the visual things that strikes me about this book is how at odds it is with its 1973 publication date. Even then it would have looked like a book from another era. Presumably, apart from the ‘additions’, it faithfully replicates the original Christmas keepsake layout.

From: A Tally Of Types, With Additions By Several Hands
Publisher: Cambridge University Press | Stanley Morison | Edited by Brooke Crutchley | London 1973

From: A Tally Of Types, With Additions By Several HandsPublisher: Cambridge University Press | Stanley Morison | Edited by Brooke Crutchley | London 1973

From: A Tally Of Types, With Additions By Several Hands
Publisher: Cambridge University Press | Stanley Morison | Edited by Brooke Crutchley | London 1973

From: A Tally Of Types, With Additions By Several Hands
Publisher: Cambridge University Press | Stanley Morison | Edited by Brooke Crutchley | London 1973

From: A Tally Of Types, With Additions By Several Hands
Publisher: Cambridge University Press | Stanley Morison | Edited by Brooke Crutchley | London 1973

From: A Tally Of Types, With Additions By Several Hands
Publisher: Cambridge University Press | Stanley Morison | Edited by Brooke Crutchley | London 1973

From: A Tally Of Types, With Additions By Several HandsPublisher: Cambridge University Press | Stanley Morison | Edited by Brooke Crutchley | London 1973

From: A Tally Of Types, With Additions By Several Hands
Publisher: Cambridge University Press | Stanley Morison | Edited by Brooke Crutchley | London 1973

From: A Tally Of Types, With Additions By Several HandsPublisher: Cambridge University Press | Stanley Morison | Edited by Brooke Crutchley | London 1973

From: A Tally Of Types, With Additions By Several Hands
Publisher: Cambridge University Press | Stanley Morison | Edited by Brooke Crutchley | London 1973

From: A Tally Of Types, With Additions By Several HandsPublisher: Cambridge University Press | Stanley Morison | Edited by Brooke Crutchley | London 1973

From: A Tally Of Types, With Additions By Several Hands
Publisher: Cambridge University Press | Stanley Morison | Edited by Brooke Crutchley | London 1973

From: A Tally Of Types, With Additions By Several HandsPublisher: Cambridge University Press | Stanley Morison | Edited by Brooke Crutchley | London 1973

From: A Tally Of Types, With Additions By Several Hands
Publisher: Cambridge University Press | Stanley Morison | Edited by Brooke Crutchley | London 1973

From: A Tally Of Types, With Additions By Several HandsPublisher: Cambridge University Press | Stanley Morison | Edited by Brooke Crutchley | London 1973

From: A Tally Of Types, With Additions By Several Hands
Publisher: Cambridge University Press | Stanley Morison | Edited by Brooke Crutchley | London 1973

From: A Tally Of Types, With Additions By Several HandsPublisher: Cambridge University Press | Stanley Morison | Edited by Brooke Crutchley | London 1973

From: A Tally Of Types, With Additions By Several Hands
Publisher: Cambridge University Press | Stanley Morison | Edited by Brooke Crutchley | London 1973

From: A Tally Of Types, With Additions By Several Hands
Publisher: Cambridge University Press | Stanley Morison | Edited by Brooke Crutchley | London 1973

From: A Tally Of Types, With Additions By Several Hands
Publisher: Cambridge University Press | Stanley Morison | Edited by Brooke Crutchley | London 1973

Notes on ‘Stanley Morison 1889–1967’

"A copy of The Monotype Recorder is sent gratis to every printing office with ‘Monotype’ machines.” 

Currently still reading through this at the point of posting these scans, but it is proving to be a fascinating document. I knew little of either The Monotype Recorder, or Stanley Morison when uncovering this in a second-hand bookshop last August, (2013). 

Already noted on Dubdog, in relation to the Intelligentsia of Great Britain cover pictured below: The concept that Morison devised, which was used for several books for Gollancz publications, was to attract readers to pick up a book by making it impossible to go un-noticed. As Moran puts it: “Morison began a discussion of the book’s contents on the front of the jacket with the intention of making the reader turn to the flap and then to the book. To make sure that the book would stand out from others, black and red printing on bright yellow paper was used.” He goes on to state that: “These jackets were not welcomed by the book trade—publishers and booksellers—who thought then unfair.”

Also of interest to me is that Morison was a conscientious objector, who spent time in prison in 1916 as a ‘war-resister’.  Prior to this, he set up the Guild of the Pope’s Peace with Francis Meynell, which published anti-war pamphlets. Meynell commented: “Seldom, I think, can a propaganda body have had such handsome printing!” 

More notes to follow.

The Monotype Recorder Volume 43 Number 3 : Stanley Morison 1889–1967
Publisher: The Monotype Corporation Limited | James Moran | London Autumn 1968

From: The Monotype Recorder Volume 43 Number 3 : Stanley Morison 1889–1967Publisher: The Monotype Corporation Limited | James Moran | London Autumn 1968

From: The Monotype Recorder Volume 43 Number 3 : Stanley Morison 1889–1967
Publisher: The Monotype Corporation Limited | James Moran | London Autumn 1968